Hampton Court Palace Gardens

If hours are easily lost in Hampton Court Palace’s halls and apartments, days are easily lost in the 60 acres of Hampton Palace Gardens.

Hampton Court Palace Gardens
Hampton Court Palace Gardens

Over the centuries, many people added their own touch of beauty to the Hampton Court Palace gardens.

The Wilderness garden began as orchard in Henry VIII’s time. In the 17th century it became a series of intertwining paths with a maze of tall hedges. Today, only the maze remains. The Knot garden, although laid down in modern times, replicates the Henry VIII’s original.

The 13 fountains and the parterre of the Great Fountain garden were the work of William III and Mary II. The Privy, established in 1702, was King William’s private garden. The Orangery was built to nurture Mary II’s exotic collection which included cacti, orange and lemon trees.

The Yew trees were planted by Queen Anne.

The grapevine, which still yields delicious grapes, was planted in 1768 by the renowned landscape gardener, Capability Brown. The sunken Pond gardens which once held freshwater fish are now planted with flowers.

The flower beds are Victorian and the herbaceous borders were added in 1920.

The 20th century garden was converted from a horse paddock in the 1970s to train apprentice gardeners.

Last but not least, the snippet of sky on the header of this Travelstripe Blog was snapped above the Rose Garden at Hampton Court Palace.

 

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